The House on Mulberry Street and Clues to Irish Roots

Posted by slau on December 11, 2014 in Family History

I’ve located my maternal great-grandparents, John and Margaret Ellen (Cunningham) Haffey in Wayne County, Ohio in the 1880 census. I’m trying to locate their births in Ireland. I have their death records, but they didn’t list a specific Irish birthplace. I have found a record in the New York Emigrant Savings Bank for a John… Read more

Titanic Captain Is One of a Million Historic Liverpool Sailors on Newly Digitized Crew Lists

Posted by wexon on December 9, 2014 in Family History

We are all familiar with the ill-fated maiden voyage of the RMS Titanic. On the night of the 14th of April 1912, 1,500 people lost their lives after the liner hit an iceberg and sank to the depths of the Atlantic Ocean. The captain on that tragic voyage was Edward Smith. Smith joined the White Star… Read more

Five Mistakes to Avoid When Researching Your Family History

Posted by wexon on December 3, 2014 in Family History

We all make mistakes! The key to success in family history research, as in life, is to learn from them. In an effort to guide you through your genealogical journey, we have created this list containing the top five mistakes to avoid when researching your family tree. 1. Assuming a family name is only spelled… Read more

Down the Mine at 89: Working Life of Elderly Victorians Revealed

Posted by wexon on September 2, 2014 in Family History

Analysis of historic census records reveals the majority of over-65s in Victorian England worked full-time – Ancestry Victorian census reveals farmers, miners, servants and cleaners in their eighties or nineties More than half (57 per cent) of people had to work beyond the age of 65 compared to just 10 per cent today Records also show how so-called… Read more

Titanic Mystery Solved with DNA Testing

Posted by wexon on July 3, 2014 in Family History

DNA solved a 70-year-old question of whether Loraine Allison survived the Titanic crash. Many have wondered what happened to the two-year-old little girl who disappeared from the crash more than 100 years ago. The story begins with Hudson and Bess taking their two kids, Trevor, seven months, and Loraine, two years of age, across the… Read more

New Warwickshire Parish Records

Posted by wexon on July 3, 2014 in Family History

Wherever you are in the old county of Warwickshire, you’re surrounded by history – from the Cathedral in Coventry, to Rugby School, to Warwick’s Tudor houses. The region has played host to some of our most important figures – William Shakespeare was born in Stratford, while it’s said that the Gunpowder Plot was hatched in… Read more

New Dorset Records – Are You Descended from Pirates?

Posted by wexon on July 3, 2014 in Family History

Abandon all hope, ye who enter Ancestry today. There be pirates about, and they be thirsty for your blood. Actually, strictly speaking, we’re hoping that our pirates already share your blood. These scurvy dogs – who appear as part of nine new Dorset record collections we’re launching today – are real historical people who could… Read more

New London records – Freemen of the City

Posted by wexon on July 3, 2014 in Family History

When it comes to family history, London is definitely a special case. To have a realistic chance of finding ancestors in most other parts of the UK, you need to have some sort of local connection. With the capital, though, it’s worth anybody searching the records – because so many people owned businesses or second… Read more

Warwickshire Occupational and Quarter Sessions Records – Hair Powder Certificates

Posted by wexon on July 3, 2014 in Family History

Authored by Rob Eyre.  Rob has more than 20 years experience working with the public in archive repositories and has been a Senior Archivist at the Warwickshire County Record Office since 2005. Hair Powder Certificates One of the more obscure sources of information for family historians focussing on the 18th century are the returns of… Read more

Jack, James, and Daniel to Be Most Popular Names — if England Win World Cup

Posted by wexon on July 2, 2014 in Family History

A 1966 naming trend reveals how the names of England’s World Cup squad members will soar if they win the tournament – Ancestry Names of England’s 1966 World Cup winners doubled in popularity after Wembley win Trend would mean nearly 30,000 extra boys with same name as 2014 Lions Jack Wilshere can expect to see his… Read more