Kristen Hyde

Kristen is Ancestry's Social Media Manager for the United Kingdom.

When long lost family leads to newfound friends

Posted by Kristen Hyde on August 8, 2017 in AncestryDNA

How Kate’s curiosity about her heritage led to the discovery of long lost family in the USA. When Kate McNeill decided to take an AncestryDNA test, it wasn’t with the intention of finding a long lost family member or solving a family secret. She was simply a bit curious about what she could find out Read More

An Education: learning about London’s School Registers

Posted by Kristen Hyde on July 24, 2017 in Collections, United Kingdom

Ancestry’s Senior Content Manager, Miriam Silverman takes us through the new London school records from the London Metropolitan Archives. These two collections include admissions and discharges in mainstream schools that took place during the First World War, as well as an entirely new database of Pauper children’s registers, shedding an insight into the lives of a Read More

The poignancy of researching your military ancestors

Posted by Kristen Hyde on July 21, 2017 in Collections, Research, United Kingdom

Ancestry Progenealogists‘ Simon Pearce, explores some of Ancestry’s key collections for researching the military careers of your ancestors.  The armed forces were incredibly diligent at keeping records of those who dedicated their time and careers to military service. As such, military records can be incredibly beneficial when researching the lives of your ancestors; not only Read More

Retiring from The Ripper: exploring 80 years of London police pensions

Posted by Kristen Hyde on June 29, 2017 in Collections, United Kingdom

Did your ancestors walk the beat and help keep the peace in London? You could find them in our Metropolitan Police Pension Registers, 1852-1932 collection, digitised from original records held by The National Archives. The collection consists of registers of pensions awarded to Metropolitan Police officers who retired or resigned from the force between 1852 Read More

Life lessons at the School of DNA

Posted by Kristen Hyde on June 13, 2017 in AncestryDNA

When you’re a kid you think your parents know everything, but how much do they really know about their own story? This is what we set out to discover with the help of the pupils and parents from east London’s Southwold Primary School. We asked the kids where they thought their parents were from and Read More

Understanding the basics of AncestryDNA

Posted by Kristen Hyde on June 8, 2017 in AncestryDNA

Our DNA network is now over four million people strong. That means four million people from around the world have sent us a tube of their saliva and in return, have learnt about the hidden truths within their DNA. But what are these ‘hidden truths’? What do you actually get when you take an AncestryDNA Read More

When Ancestry met Cherry

Posted by Kristen Hyde on June 2, 2017 in AncestryDNA

Cherry Healey isn’t afraid of a challenge. In her documentary work with the BBC, she’s explored everything from the psychology of sales tricks to how to make a cracking cup of tea. And she’s no stranger to getting introspective. Her book, ‘Letters to my Fanny’ is a candid anthology of confessions, exploring what it’s like Read More

Your identity: the result that really matters

Posted by Kristen Hyde on June 1, 2017 in AncestryDNA

We’re always being asked who we are. Labour or Conservative? Brexiter or Remainer? United or City? Our identities are the subject of constant questioning and investigation. One scan of social media reveals dozens of links inviting us to learn more about ourselves. “Which history-making Queen are you?” or “Jedi vs Sith: which is your personality Read More

An Alien Act Against the Irish, The Poor Law Removal Law (Statute 8 & 9 Vict. C 117)

Posted by Kristen Hyde on May 25, 2017 in Collections, Regional, Research, United Kingdom, Website

Our latest Irish collection, Ireland, Poor Law Union Removals From England, 1859-1860, gives us a window in to what life was like as an Irish pauper living in the UK in the late 1850’s. Irish paupers were often looked upon negatively, as an unwanted expense on the local communities in which they resided across England, Read More